War And Peace (1972)

War And Peace
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Violence

Actor: Anthony Hopkins

Leo Tolstoy's timeless masterpiece of love and loss is universally recognised as one of the greatest novels ever written. Focusing on the consequences faces by three Russian families during the Napoleonic Wars, this classic work is retold in twenty parts in this epic BBC production, complete with award winning design and breathtaking battle sequences. Anthony Hopkins heads the cast as the soul-searching Pierre Bezuhov (a role for which he won the 1972 Best Actor BAFTA); Morag Hood is the impulsive and beautiful Natasha Rostova; Alan Dobie is the dour but heroic Andrei Bolkonsky; and David Swift is Napoleon, whose decision to invade Russia in 1812 has far reaching consequences for both the Rostov and Bolkonsky families.

DVD Boxset
Status: LongWait
Run time: 500mins
Origin: UNITED KINGDOM
Aspect Ratio: 16:9

Member Reviews (1)

John N.
says
An epic covering two decades at the beginning of the 19th Century concerning five aristocratic families living in Moscow and St Petersburg, the interaction of the members with each other, and their involvement in the European conflicts of the time. The adaptation of Tolstoy's novel into twenty 45-minute episodes is meticulously accurate with all the major strands of the story given their full value, and much of the dialogue reproduced word-for-word. Some philosophizing and political and religious discussion has been necessarily shortened or omitted. The battle scenes and Napoleon's invasion and ultimate withdrawal from Russia are impressively done. The cast has been chosen with great care, which can be borne out by reading the novel, the enjoyment of which is greatly enhanced by having an accurate portrayal of the characters and scenes fresh in the mind. Military operations do play an important part in the story, but the public and private lives of the main characters take up a greater part of the film, and are not unlike the emotional entanglements encountered in a Jane Austin novel, only in a different social setting. An altogether brilliant and satisfying production.
Posted Tuesday, 2 June 2009 See my other reviews